Cauliflower 7 ways: A Cauliflower Recipe Round-UP for AIP

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In the Paleo world, cauliflower is king. I can’t speak for everyone, but this vegetable went from highly underrated to a weekly staple in my house; replacing rice and potato dishes that I didn’t even know I would miss.  Anyone who has been paying attention or reading this blog knows that I love me some cauliflower rice.  But I also love some mashed cauliflower: it is a serious comfort food that visits my dish when I am cold, tired, and want something delicious and warm.  So I have dedicated this article to this wondrous vegetable: I have included 4 pilaf recipes and 2 mashed cauliflower instructions (just in case you have never tried this before!).  In addition, I have included some links to instructions for freezing your cauliflower rice ahead of time to make weeknight dinners even easier! I also included a breakfast idea for a yummy bowl of comfort any time of day! That is 7 recipes and a batch cooking life-hack! Enjoy! I know I will….

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Lemon Caper Dill Cauliflower Rice Pilaf

 

Ingredients

  • 1/2 head of cauliflower, riced. This is about 3 cups riced if you are using a pre-riced cauliflower. I did not measure exactly.
  • the juice and zest of one lemon
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons of capers. In order to avoid a vinegar that is derived from corn or wheat, try these salt-packed capers.  They will re-hydrate in the lemon juice.
  • 1/4 cup of chopped, fresh dill.
  • 2 cloves of minced garlic
  • sea salt to taste
  • 1 cup of chopped leeks, bulb only (the white part). You could use onions, but I have not tried this and would probably start with 1/4 cup as they have a stronger taste.
  • Olive oil, about 2 to 4 tablespoons.
  • Optional: 1/4 cup bone broth

Directions:

Heat olive oil over medium heat, adding chopped leeks and minced garlic, heating until leeks are tender and stirring as needed to keep from burning or sticking.

Add the rest of the ingredients, except for the dill and the bone broth.  If more liquid is needed, then add the bone broth slowly.  You may or may not use all the bone broth or you may use none, depending on your skillet and how much liquid is needed or not needed.  Turn down low or medium low and let it steam until the capers and the cauliflower are moist but not mushy, about 5 minutes. Stir occasionally during this time to ensure that the moisture is evenly distributed.  Add fresh dill and fold into the hot “pilaf”, letting the steam wilt the green fronds.  Serve immediately.

This also good left over the next day, reheated or served cold as a salad or side. I suggest serving this with fish such as salmon or Mahi.  Asparagus is a natural addition to this meal.

For Scallopini Cauliflower Rice Pilaf, use the same recipe as above, replacing the fresh dill with fresh thyme and adding it with the rest of the ingredients if desired. Chicken is a suggested accompaniment with this dish.  An arugula salad is also a natural addition to this pairing.

LEMON DILL CAPER CAULIFLOWER RICE AIP

 Garlic and Herb Cauliflower Rice Pilaf

Ingredients

  • 1/2 head of cauliflower, riced. This is about 3 cups riced if you are using a pre-riced cauliflower. I did not measure exactly.
  • 1 cup chopped, fresh,  mixed herbs: I suggest any combination of basil, oregano, parsley, rosemary, thyme.
  • 5 cloves of minced garlic
  • sea salt to taste
  • 1 cup of chopped leeks, bulb only (the white part). You could use onions, but I have not tried this and would probably start with 1/4 cup as they have a stronger taste.
  • Olive oil, about 2 to 4 tablespoons.
  • Optional: 1/4 cup bone broth

Directions

Heat olive oil over medium heat, adding chopped leeks and minced garlic, heating until leeks are tender and stirring as needed to keep from burning or sticking.

Add the rest of the ingredients, except for the bone broth.  If more liquid is needed, then add the bone broth slowly.  You may or may not use all the bone broth or you may use none, depending on your skillet and how much liquid is required or not.  You do not want excess moisture.

Turn down low or medium low and let it steam about 4 to 5 minutes. Stir occasionally during this time to ensure that the moisture is evenly distributed and that none more is needed.

This also good left over the next day, reheated or served cold as a salad or side. I suggest serving this with chicken or pork.  This pairing lends itself to some hearty greens such as spinach, collars or kale as an additional side dish.

 Lime-Cilantro Cauliflower Rice Pilaf

Cauliflower Rice with pulled pork carnitas- AIP

Ingredients

  • Raw Cauliflower– 1 cup per person or 2 cups, measured in chunks
  • Cilantro, Fresh.  I suggest about a cup, but you may add according to your tastes.
  • 1 lime,
  • A lime zester
  • A food processor
  • A pinch of Sea Salt
  • 1-2 cloves of minced garlic
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons Cooking fat.  I suggest coconut oil.

Directions

Chop the cauliflower into chunks that are manageable for a food processor and add the vegetable chunks to the processor.  Turn the processor on and let it mince the cauliflower until it has a rice or couscous like texture.

Chop the cilantro by hand and reserve.

Heat the oil over medium to medium low and add the cauliflower, stirring and folding so as to evenly heat.

Add garlic and fold again.

Zest the lime over the mixture and fold that into the mix.

The cauliflower will absorb much of the fat, so you may find you need to add more fat, a little broth, or some water, being careful not to use enough liquid to make it “soupy”.

Add the cilantro and sea salt.  Fold  the mixture to mix thoroughly and serve immediately.

Suggested pairings: This side dish is great with pulled pork but is also good with fish. It makes a great addition to Mexican-inspired dishes such as carnitas or “taco” salads or as a substitute for rice in a Mexican “rice” bowl.

Also, if you haven’t tried my Asian Cauliflower Rice yet, then click here for the recipe.  It is truly my favorite one!

Mashed “Caulitatoes”

Steam desired cauliflower with a few cloves of garlic (I suggest 2 cloves per half a head of cauliflower) and add vegetables to the food processor after cooking  completely.  While food processor has been turned on, add olive oil, sea salt and additional herbs, being careful not to over-do it on the olive oil so as to avoid your “Caulitatoes” being too thin.  I like to add about 1 to 2 tablespoons for each 1/2 head of cauliflower.

Option: add some fresh or dried herbs to the food processor to add a “zest” or create a garlic and herb mash.


“Loaded” Caulitatoes.

Using the recipe above, replace the olive oil with bacon grease.  After mixing, top with crumbled bacon, sautéed onions, mushrooms and other vegetables of choice.

And more…

As promised, here is a great link to a batch cooking hack: This post by The Pinning Mama is a great way to know how to prep your “rice” ahead of time.  While her Mexican cauli-rice is not AIP compliant (includes re-introductions), her roasted cauli-rice is compliant IF you omit the black pepper (maybe replace it with some oregano or tarragon?).  The Indian cauli-rice also includes some re-introductions but could be altered if you are confident in your ability to do that.

I hear from others that you can buy cauliflower rice already “riced” and frozen from Trader Joe’s.  But if you do not have a Trader Joe’s or if, like me, yours does not carry this convenience, you can always create your own via this life-hack.  It is usually less expensive, also, to process your own vegetables and would be a great idea to do when you find cauliflower on sale for a great price.

For those tempted to rice and then refrigerate, I caution you against this.  Cauliflower has a tendency to mold.  Usually the mold is limited to the outside and can be cut off before using so as not to waste food unnecessarily.  “Riced” cauliflower has a lot of “outsides” and will mean having to throw away the entire bag if it is not frozen.

Also, I wanted to give a shout out to this recipe by Grass Fed Salsa.  Her picture makes me want to make a giant bowl of this “breakfast” for all 3 meals of my day.  It truly points out the comfort food status of this modern classic. Simply sub carrots  for the mushrooms and omit the coconut aminos and yeast if you cannot tolerate yeasts, fungi or ferments for any reason. Otherwise, enjoy this simple feast.


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